viernes, 31 de agosto de 2012

Oracle y Red Hat abanderan un nuevo estándar para la nube


Fuente: ComputerWorld España.

Con el nombre de CAMP, una serie de proveedores cloud liderados por Red Hat y Oracle han sentado las bases de un nuevo estándar que busca facilitar el uso y la gestión de las cargas de trabajo en entornos PaaS (Platform as a Service). 

La nube, cada vez más estandarizada. Esa es la tendencia que la industria parece estar impulsando en la actualidad y buena prueba de ello es que varios de los principales proveedores del sector han trabajado juntos para impulsar un nuevo estándar en entornos PaaS. 

Así, Oracle y Red Hat (junto a otras empresas de la talla de Rackspace, Huawei, Software AG o CloudSoft) han sentado las bases de un estándar para los comandos de control de las nubes PaaS, un hecho que permitirá migrar de forma fácil y sencilla las cargas de trabajo de un servicio a otro. 

Y es que en los últimos tiempos han proliferado las ofertas de servicios PaaS pero cada proveedor, como Elastic Compute Amazon Cloud (EC2) o Microsoft Azure, ofrecía su propia consola, incompatible con las restantes. Tal vez el mayor esfuerzo hasta ahora para normalizar las PaaS ha sido Eucalyptus, una plataforma cloud de código abierto que utiliza las API de Amazon. 

"El inicio y la detención de una aplicación realmente deberían ser estandarizados para que sea más fácil para los clientes gestionar sus aplicaciones en diferentes plataformas", afirma Jeff Mischkinsky, director senior de Oracle Fusion Middleware, quien ha tenido un papel fundamental en el desarrollo de la norma. 

La norma, recogida por la OASIS (Organización para el Desarrollo de Estándares de Información Estructurada), ha recibido las siglas de CAMP (Gestión en la nube de aplicaciones entre plataformas) y se compone de una API que coordina un conjunto de comandos para gestionar las cargas de trabajo de las PaaS. 

CAMP también incluye especificaciones sobre cómo empaquetar una carga de trabajo. "Definimos las necesidades básicas de todo el ciclo de vida de las aplicaciones", explica Mischkinsky. En futuras ediciones de la norma se abordarán nuevas funcionalidades, todas ellas encaminadas a facilitar la migración de las cargas de trabajo. 

Oracle: Leading with Linux, Then and Now

Oracle LinuxCon Presentation
Sourge: , linux.com

Adopting Linux as a platform has helped change Oracle over the past 15 years from a fragmented, decentralized behemoth to a sleek, consolidated service provider, said Senior VP and CIO Mark Sunday in Oracle’s LinuxCon keynote presentation Friday morning.


Mark Sunday, left, and Wim Coekaerts of Oracle present at LinuxCon 2012.
In exchange, Oracle also played a large role in shaping Linux, especially in the server space, said Wim Coekaerts, Oracle’s Senior Vice President of Linux and Virtualization Engineering, during the presentation.


Linux is the standard operating system for all of Oracle’s internal business systems and product development as well as the basis for the business services the company offers its customers, he said.

“Everything we do… is done leveraging Linux,” Sunday said.

On the product development side Oracle now has 40,000 environments all running on heavily virtualized Linux servers. This “Oracle farm” was the company’s first cloud deployment, allowing on-demand provisioning of resources that are scalable and widely available, Sunday said. The company offers those same resources to customers with managed hosting on Oracle products and a wide variety of software-as-a-service products.
Now the company is scaling up again and integrating Linux into the systems it builds for customers. The roughly 100 acquisitions Oracle has made over the past eight years have been aimed at gathering all of the components to make a complete integration possible, Sunday said. For example, companies no longer need to buy servers and storage networking then layer in a file system and a database. Oracle packages it into a single IT product.

A Stable Enterprise OS Evolves


Wim Coekaerts, Oracle.






Oracle contributions to the Linux kernel helped bring the operating system up to speed with other Unix-based systems in the early days. The company’s involvement eventually led to the “somewhat controversial” decision to become a Linux distribution vendor, providing support for the whole stack, said Coekaerts.

The next step in Oracle’s evolution with Linux was building an extensive testing system in 2008 and 2009, Coekaerts said.

“It’s not just about development when you produce a product,” he said. “Bug fixing and QA is the less cool part but a very critical part.”
In the past few years the development model for Linux has changed and the pace of releases has become very rapid. New features are available for customers as soon as they are added and users are increasingly defining the platform.

After kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman pushed legacy vendors to be more current, Oracle began providing a kernel to customers that is more mainline-based, within five to six months of the new releases, Coekaerts said.

“Linux has been very useful to us in getting new features into the hands of customers sooner,” Coekaerts said.

“If we’re closer to what Linus maintains we have new features sooner,” he said.

The challenge now lies in continuing to improve the operating system’s performance and reliability. The QA process will be critical to this, Coekaerts said, but not all developers have in-house access to a test suite like the larger distributions provide to their developers, he said.

“We need to have a test suite for the operating system that ships with the kernel source,” Coekaerts said. “It’s important to start building test suites for Linux features as the kernel develops.”

What is MySQL denormalization and should you be doing it?


Fuente: linux.org

Introduction

Originally, I was going to write an tutorial over MySQL Performance Tuning Tips & Tricks. I quickly realized that this tutorial would be a bullet list of Tips & Tricks, and thus would be too short and require users to go searching elsewhere for terms they did not understand, or would lose users because it would become far too long. Instead I decided to hash out a series of tutorials to publish individually. While none of these tutorials will build off of each other, some terms you learn in one may be referenced in others.

In this tutorial we will take a look at what Database Denormalization is and how it is different from Normalization. Many DBAs probably use the Normalization rules in designing databases, either because they have never heard of Denormalization or they do not fully understand it.

What is Normalization?

We will start off by looking at Database Normalization. The primary reason for this is because many people were taugh that they should always "Normalize" their databases. Normalized data means that fields and tables in a relational database have been organized to reduce redundancy and dependency by dividing up larger tables and linking them through the uses of Indexes. While this makes for a cleaner overall layout, and seems to make sense, it is not always the best course of action.

Why do people Normalize?

In my opinion, the answer to this question is because that is how they were taught. For some reason the most widely accepted method of teaching is the Normalized method described above. It seems to make sense to populate, modify and delete data in one table and have it propagate through the entire database through the use of defined relationships.

One example of where this would make sense would be a table called students. The denormalized layout for this table would have the following columns: student_id, student_name, student_email, student_address, course_number. In this example, a student could easily be enrolled in 10-15 different courses. If that students address changed for any reason, that would mean that a query would have to perform 10-15 updates on the address column for that student.

The normalized approach for the same example would have a students table (student_id, student_name, student_email, student_address) and a enrolled_courses table (enrolled_course_id, student_id, course_name, course_number). We might even take this one step further and move course_name and course_number to a table called courses (course_id, course_name, course_number). That would mean our new enrolled_courses table would look like: enrolled_course_id, course_id, student_id.

In the denormalized approach lets assume that it is a new semester and student A did not re-enroll for that semester because he needed planned to take a semester break. Since the semester has ended we would empty all the rows from the database since students will no longer be enrolled in those courses. Since student A is not going to re-enroll his data vanishes along with the course data. When he does decide to enroll in new course all his information must be re-entered into the system.

What is Denormalization?

Now lets take a look at Database Denormalization. This is the process by with DBAs attempt to optimize the performance of the database by adding in redundant, or grouped, data. The advantages to this is that the data is stored in one table, as opposed to multiple smaller tables, which cuts back on the need for JOINS in your queries, resulting in faster SELECTS. It is also good to note that a single table allows for a more efficient index usage. With properly indexed columns, results can be filtered and sorted by utilizing the same index.

What are the downsides?

The downsides really aren't big, and for the most part can be easily solved. One thing you must consider is that in a denormalized database, data can be duplicated across many tables. While this will result in better indexing and faster SELECTS as explained above, it does make INSERTS and UPDATES a bit more complicated. This is where it comes down to weighing the pros and cons. It all comes down to a ratio of reads VS. writes. If you have high reads and low writes, then denormalized is the sure way to go. If you are about even, or if you have higher writes than reads, you can still go with the denormalized approach but it may require a bit more thinking and planning.

Which should I use?

By now you're probably wondering which one to use. We've looked at just a few pros and cons to both approaches, and really it comes down to an almost 50/50 scale. The solution to this is simple: The correct way is to utilize both the normalized and denormalized approaches depending on the situations. Most of you are probably disappointed by the lack of a climax ending, and you were probably thinking that I was about to advocate a denormalized database over a normalized one, but that simply isn't the point of this tutorial. The point was to introduce you to denormalization, and to get you thinking and approaching database design in a new way. Many people spend all their time tweaking configuration settings and trying to optimize queries (mainly JOIN statements, which at their heart is really a complex nested-loop), when in fact they could get a huge bump in performance by taking a moment to ask themselves, "Should this be normalized or denormalized?"

As a side note, I will say that knowing your database engines can be a big help in boosting performance too. Knowing when to use MyISAM or InnoDB, and knowing when you should use something like ARCHIVE which only allows INSERTS and READS. At the end of the day the best performance boost you can give yourself is properly planning out your database layout upfront. See my tutorial An Introduction To MySQL Storage Engines.

Ronald Steelman

Linux 4.x podría ver su nacimiento en 3 años

"La espera entre Linux 2.x y 3.x fue larga, pero la espera para Linux 4?

Bueno, eso sólo será cuestión de tres años, de acuerdo con Linus Torvalds.

"Es sólo mentalmente mucho más fácil para las personas para recordar el número pequeño ", dijo Torvalds durante la conferencia LinuxCon en San Diego [ miércoles anterior, según el sitio SLASHDOT.ORG].

" Haremos 4,0 en tres años, tal vez cuando los subnúmeros de los releases, hayan crecido a los 20's y nuestros cerebros débiles no pueden manejar la situación."

Únete al facebook de Oracle Latino América



Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oraclelatinoamerica

Bienvenidos amigos y amigas de Nicaragua. OUG Nicaragua


Saludos hermanos y hermanas nicaraguenses.

El día de hoy iniciamos el camino, para la integración de toda la comunidad Oracle de Nicaragua, dentro de las organizaciones en la Comunidad de Grupos de Usuarios Oracle.

Hace 3 años Costa Rica, fué el primer país en organizarse y luego 2 años después, Guatemala y Honduras, crearon sus OUG y participarán de su primer OTN TOUR LATINOAMERICA, el pasado mes de julio en su tercera edición.

Guatemala y Honduras, tuvieron la suerte de contar en su primer evento oficial, con la visita de grandes figuras del mundo Oracle, como el famoso Tom Kyte de ASKTOM, Graham Wood, Tim Hall, Debra Lilley, Sherri Cabral entre otros.

A principios del mes de abril de este año, también se establecieron contactos con personas en El Salvador, para integrar y organizar el OUG de aquella nación. Varios Salvadoreños, atendieron el OTN TOUR en Guatemala y pueden dar fe, de la excelencia del evento y de la calidad de contenido técnico del mismo.

Esperamos que todos y todas, se nos unan en los próximos días y hagamos arrancar la organización.

En este momento, Guatemala cuenta con 373 amigos en el facebook, Honduras con 159, Costa Rica con 556 y el Salvador que aún esta en proceso de arranque, lo que nos dice, que en este momento, estamos cercanos a llegar a los 1.100 miembros dentro de OUG en la zona Centroamerica.  Con tu apoyo, podremos fácilmente, superar este número y aportar su cuota.

El link para la página oficial es: https://www.facebook.com/oug.nicaragua email: oug.nicaragua@gmail.com

Supported Virtualization and Partitioning Technologies for Oracle Database and RAC Product Releases


Unix & Linux Operating Systems

Date: 31/08/2012

This page contains certification information on supported virtualization and partitioning technologies for Oracle Database and RAC product releases.

Note: If an Operating System (OS) vendor releases a newer OS version, along with a complementary virtualization/partitioning technology, the support of this new combination depends on the following:
  • The new OS must be certified by Oracle.
  • The new OS plus the virtualization/partitioning solution is guaranteed by the appropriate hardware vendor to be backward compatible to the version listed in the tables below.

The following table identifies the supported virtualization/partitioning technologies for Oracle Database and RAC


Platform Virtualization Technology Operating System Certified Oracle Single Instance Database Releases Certified Oracle RAC Database Releases
Oracle Solaris Sparc Dynamic Domain Solaris 9
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
Solaris 10
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1 Note
  • 11gR2
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
Solaris 11
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
Oracle VM Server for SPARC Solaris 10
Solaris 11
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
Oracle Solaris Containers Solaris 10
Solaris 11
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
Oracle Solaris 8 Branded Zone
Oracle Solaris 9 Branded Zone
Solaris 10
  • N/A
Oracle Solaris x86-64 Oracle Solaris Containers Solaris 10
Solaris 11
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=11.2.0.3) Note
Oracle VM Server for x86-64 Solaris 10
IBM AIX Power Dynamic Logical Partitions (DLPAR) and Micro Partitions AIX 5.3
AIX 6.1
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
AIX 7.1
Live Partition Migration (LPM) AIX 5.3
  • No
AIX 6.1
AIX 7.1
Workload Partition (WPAR) AIX 6.1
  • No
Active Memory Expansion (AME) AIX 6.1
AIX 7.1
HP-UX Itanium Integrity VM HP-UX 11.31 or HP-UX 11.23 Guest
  • 9iR2 (>=HPVM 3.5) Note
  • 10gR1 (>=HPVM 3.5) Note
  • 10gR2 (>=HPVM 3.5) Note
  • 11gR1 (>=HPVM 4.0) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=HPVM 4.2) Note
  • No
Integrity VM Live Migration HP-UX 11.31 or HP-UX 11.23 Guest
  • 10gR2 (>=10.2.0.4) (>=HPVM 4.1) Note
  • 11gR1 (>=HPVM 4.1) Note
  • 11gR2 (>=HPVM 4.2) Note
  • No
Containers (SRP) HP-UX 11.31
  • N/A
nPartition (nPAR) Static HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
nPartition (nPAR) Dynamic HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • No
Virtual Partitions (vPAR) Static HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
Virtual Partitions (vPAR) Dynamic HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2 (>=10.2.0.3)
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2 Note
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2 (>=10.2.0.3)
  • 11gR1
HP PA-RISC nPartition (nPAR) Static HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
nPartition (nPAR) Dynamic HP-UX 11.31
  • No
HP-UX 11.23
  • No
Containers (SRP) HP-UX 11.31
  • No
Virtual Partitions (vPAR) Static HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2
  • 11gR1
Virtual Partitions (vPAR) Dynamic HP-UX 11.31
  • 10gR2 (10.2.0.3)
  • 11gR1
  • 11gR2
HP-UX 11.23
  • 10gR2 (10.2.0.3)
  • 11gR1
Linux x86 Oracle VM Oracle VM v2
Oracle VM v3
Oracle VM Live Migration Oracle VM v2
Linux x86-64 Oracle VM Oracle VM v2
Oracle VM v3
Oracle VM Live Migration Oracle VM v2
Linux on Power Dynamic Logical Partitions (LPAR) DLPAR with shared pool and micro partitions RHEL SLES
  • 10gR2
  • 10gR2
IBM System z z/VM and System z LPAR's RHEL SLES




Oracle Solaris Sparc Notes

  • For 11gR1, please apply Oracle patch 8799617 and OS patch 138888-07 on Solaris 10 10/08 (Update6) or later.
  • Oracle Solaris Dynamic Domains are supported with Oracle Single Instance and RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.3 and above) on Solaris 11.
  • Oracle supports the single instance database in "Oracle Solaris 8 Containers" & "Oracle Solaris 9 Containers" (also known as Solaris 8 Branded Zones & Solaris 9 Branded Zones) on a host running Solaris 10. Supported versions are Solaris 8 Containers 1.0.1 and Solaris 9 Containers 1.0.1 running on Solaris 10 Update 10/8 and later. Please check the documentation for the appropriate Oracle Database version to ensure the corresponding Solaris versions are supported. See Documents for further information:
  • Using Oracle RAC on Oracle Solaris Containers within an Oracle VM Server for SPARC (LDoms) is not supported. Oracle Single Instance database on Oracle Solaris Containers within an Oracle VM Server for SPARC (LDoms) is supported
  • 11gR1 (11.1.0.7) Solaris 10 Logical Domains on Sparc 64-bit requires patch 7535429
  • Oracle Solaris Logical Domains are supported with Oracle RAC 10gR2, 11gR1 and 11gR2 with Solaris version 10 Update 8 or later with Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.2 1/09 and later versions of 3.2 and Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3
  • Oracle Solaris Logical Domains are supported with Oracle RAC 11gR2 with Solaris version 10 Update 6 or later (patches 142900-12, 141870-03) with Oracle Clusterware 11.2
  • Oracle Solaris Logical Domains are supported with Oracle RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.3 and above) on Solaris 11 with Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0
  • Oracle VM for SPARC (formerly known as Logical Domains) are supported with Oracle RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.3 and above) on Solaris 11 with Oracle Clusterware 11.2.0.3.0
  • Please reference My Oracle Support note 317257.1 for best practices document for deploying Oracle Single Instance database in a Solaris Container.
  • Please reference the RAC/Container Best Practices document for deploying Oracle RAC in Solaris Containers.
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 9iR2 (9.2.0.5 and above), 10gR2 and 11gR1 (with Oracle Solaris Cluster on SPARC). Solaris version 10 Update 7 or later (patches 141444-09, 143055-01, 142900-06, 143137-04 "md patch") with Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3 and 3.2u2 patched to 126106-39 or later.
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 11.2.0.2 with patch 12419331 (for Oracle Solaris Cluster on SPARC). Solaris 10 9/10 (Update 9) or later (patch 142909-17) with Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3.
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 10gR2, 11gR1 and 11gR2 with Oracle Clusterware on SPARC. Solaris version 10 Update 8 or later (patches 142900-14, 143055-01) with
    • Oracle Clusterware 10.2 (patch 9352164)
    • Oracle Clusterware 11.1 (patch 9207257, 9352179)
    • Oracle Clusterware 11.2.0.1 (patch 11840629)
    • Oracle Clusterware 11.2.0.2 (patch 12419353)
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.3 and above) on Solaris 11 with Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0


Oracle Solaris x86-64 Notes

  • Please reference My Oracle Support note 317257.1 for best practices document for deploying Oracle Single Instance database in a Solaris Container.
  • Please reference the RAC/Container Best Practices document for deploying Oracle RAC in Solaris Containers.
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 10gR2 and 11gR2 with Oracle Clusterware on Solaris x86-64. Solaris 10 10/09 (Update 8) or later (patches 142901-15, 142934-02) with
    • Oracle Clusterware 10.2 (patch 7172531)
    • Oracle Clusterware 11.2.0.1 (patch 11840629)
    • Oracle Clusterware 11.2.0.2 (patch 12419353)
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 10gR2 (patch 9654991) and 11gR2 (11.2.0.2 with patch 12419331) with Oracle Solaris Cluster on Solaris x86-64. Solaris 10 9/10 (Update 9) or later (patch 142910-17) with Oracle Solaris Cluster 3.3.
  • Oracle Solaris Containers are supported with Oracle RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.3 and above) on Solaris 11 with Oracle Solaris Cluster 4.0
  • Please check the documentation for the appropriate Oracle Database version to ensure the corresponding Solaris versions are supported. See the following document for further information:


IBM AIX Power Notes

  • Oracle DB 10gR2 (10.2.0.4) is certified to be used with the IBM AIX Workload Partition (WPAR) feature on AIX 6.1 TL-02 SP2. See WPAR Doc 889220.1.
  • Oracle DB 11gR2 (11.2.0.2) is certified to be used with the IBM AIX Workload Partition (WPAR) feature on AIX 6.1.
  • Oracle software stack is supported on deployments with the IBM Power Systems LPAR hardware partitioning technology, including the micropartition feature.
  • Oracle software stack is supported on deployments with the IBM Power Systems Virtual IO Server (VIOS), supported RAC environments are listed in the RAC section. Please refer to RAC Technologies Compatibility Matrix (RTCM) for UNIX platforms for further information.
  • Oracle DB 10gR2 (10.2.0.4) is certified to be used with the IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility (LPM) feature on AIX 5.3 with a minimum of service level of TL8 SP4 and AIX 6.1 with a minimum of service level of TL2 SP3
  • Oracle DB 11gR1 is certified to be used with the IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility (LPM) feature on AIX 5.3 with a minimum of service level of TL09 SP5 and AIX 6.1 with a minimum of service level of TL04 SP01
  • Oracle DB 11gR2 is certified to be used with the IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility (LPM) feature on AIX 5.3 with a minimum of service level of TL09 SP5
  • Oracle DB and RAC 11gR2 (11.2.0.2 and above) with ASM is certified to be used with the IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility (LPM) feature on AIX 6.1 with a minimum of service level of TL04 SP01 and on AIX 7.1 with a minimum of service level of TL00 SP02
  • Oracle DB and RAC 11gR2 is certified to be used with the IBM PowerVM Active Memory Expansion (AME) feature on AIX 6.1 with a minimum of service level of TL06 SP05 and AIX 7.1 with a minimum of service level of TL00 SP03. Please refer to Active Memory Expansion: Overview and Usage Guide and Active Memory Expansion (AME) Overview for further information.
  • Please refer to the My Oracle Support note 1307544.1 on Certification Information for Oracle Database on IBM AIX Power systems.


HP-UX Itanium Notes

Partitioning
  • Running Single Instance Oracle Database 10gR2 (10.2.0.3 and above) and 11gR2 with HP-UX Containers (SRP) v2.0.1 and above on HP-UX 11.31 is supported. Oracle Database 11gR2 with ASM is supported with SRP A.03.00 or later. Please refer to the HP SRP white paper.
  • Running Oracle Databases with Hardware partitioning (nPAR) is supported on appropriate servers
  • Running Oracle Databases with Virtual partitioning (vPAR) is supported on appropriate servers.
Itanium Information
  • Oracle 9iR2, 10gR1, 10gR2 single instance databases are supported on HPVM 3.5 and above.
    Oracle 11gR1 single instance databases are supported on HPVM4.0 and above.
  • HP Integrity VM 4.1 Live Migration and above is currently supported with Oracle database 10gR2 and 11gR1.
    HP Integrity VM 4.2 Live Migration is currently supported with Oracle database 11gR2.
  • Oracle 11gR2 single instance databases are supported on HPVM 4.2 or later, please refer to the supported minimum configuration below:
    • VMHost: HP-UX 11.31 September 2008 or later with HPVM 4.2 or later on HP Integrity servers with multi-core processors. A crash was observed while testing Oracle 11gr2 on Integrity Servers with single-core processors running HPVM 4.2. If running on single-core processor systems, please contact HP Support for details of the issue. The HPVM patch required to resolve the issue is PHSS_41247 11.31 HPVM B.04.20 CORE PATCH.
    • VMGuest: Recommended Oracle Database configuration (HP-UX 11.31 September 2008 plus several patches) along with the HPVM 4.2 Guest Libraries.
    • Please refer to http://www.hp.com/go/hpux-hpvm-docs/ for more information on the system requirements.
  • Please refer to the Oracle single instance installation guide and the HP Integrity Virtual Machines Installation,Configuration, and Administration guides:



HP-UX PA-RISC NotesPartitioning
  • Running Single Instance Oracle Database 10gR2 (10.2.0.3 and above) and 11gR2 with HP-UX Containers (SRP) v2.0.1 and above on HP-UX 11.31 is supported. Oracle Database 11gR2 with ASM is supported with SRP A.03.00 or later. Please refer to the HP SRP white paper.
  • Running Oracle Databases with Hardware partitioning (nPAR) is supported on appropriate servers.
  • Running Oracle Databases with Virtual partitioning (vPAR) is supported on appropriate servers.


Linux x86 Notes

Oracle VM Information:
  • Oracle Products are certified to run with Oracle VM. For a complete list of certified products on Oracle VM and information on Oracle VM, please refer to My Oracle Support note 464754.1 .
  • Live Migration is only supported with OVM 2.2.1 on x86 and x86-64 guests. Support is only available for the latest Database PSU versions 10gR2 (10.2.0.5), 11gR1(11.1.0.7), 11gR2 (11.2.0.2) and GRID PSU versions 10gR2 (10.2.0.5), 11gR1(11.1.0.7)
  • Please refer to RAC Technologies Compatibility Matrix (RTCM) for Linux platforms for further information.



Linux x86-64 Notes

Oracle VM Information:
  • Oracle Products are certified to run with Oracle VM. For a complete list of certified products on Oracle VM and information on Oracle VM, please refer to My Oracle Support note 464754.1.
  • Live Migration is only supported with OVM 2.2.1 on x86 and x86-64 guests. Support is only available for the latest Database PSU versions 10gR2 (10.2.0.5), 11gR1(11.1.0.7), 11gR2 (11.2.0.2) and GRID PSU versions 10gR2 (10.2.0.5), 11gR1(11.1.0.7)
  • Please refer to RAC Technologies Compatibility Matrix (RTCM) for Linux platforms for further information.


IBM System z NotesHardware Information:
  • Oracle software stack is certified and supported on certified distributions of Linux running natively in LPAR's or as a guest OS in z/VM virtual machines, deployed on IBM System z 64-bit servers.
  • Please refer to RAC Technologies Compatibility Matrix (RTCM) for Linux platforms for further information.

VMWare ofrece plazas para sus nuevas oficinas en Costa Rica

Atención a todos y todas, a través de nuestro amigo Diego Rodriguez de la emisora IQ RADIO, patrocinador oficial del OTN TOUR en nuestro país, nos ha llegado información, a cerca de un número importante de plazas que Concentrix, esta buscando para cubrir plazas para la próxima apertura de la reconocida empresa VMWare, en nuestro país. Les paso la información de los puestos con su respectivos links, para que puedan aplicar para las plazas indicadas. Como requisitos básicos esta el manejo del idioma inglés y preferiblemente conocimiento de Oracle. Por tanto, hacemos la publicación en nuestro blog, para todos los interesados.

Position:
Status:
Date Posted:
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 30, 2012
Full Time
August 29, 2012
Full Time
August 29, 2012
Full Time
August 28, 2012
Full Time
August 28, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012
Full Time
August 21, 2012